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Anonymous on September 29, 2011

After anal sex, I noticed that my anus looks black. Why would that be?

I’m a 28-year-old married woman, and my husband and I are heavy into anal sex. I noticed that my anus has become black all around. Do you know why? And is it safe for my husband to cum inside my anus?

answered by
Lisa Oldson, MD on September 29, 2011

Thank you for sharing your questions. I’ll do my best to provide useful information for your consideration.

First, about your anus area turning black...when skin changes color, it can be cause for concern...indicating possible inflammation or trauma. I would recommend that you see a specialist for a visual examination of your anal discoloration. Either a gastroenterologist or a dermatologist who’s had experience examining the anal area should be able to answer your questions. If you don’t already have someone in mind, your regular doctor should be able to refer you to a specialist. 

Now, about your husband ejaculating inside your anus...as long as you’re in a monogamous relationship with each other, and you’ve both been tested for STDs and are STD-free, there should be little or no risk of spreading a sexually transmitted infection to each other through anal sex. 

However, you may wish to speak with your doctor about including anal Pap tests as part of your routine healthcare. Just like a vaginal Pap, the anal Pap screens for the human papillomavirus (HPV). Certain strains of HPV can cause genital warts as well as cervical and anal cancer. HPV is usually transmitted through vaginal and anal sex, but it can also be spread through oral sex and genital-to-genital contact.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) now classify anal cancer as an “HPV-related cancer.” And a study by the Department of Laboratory Medicine at the University of California in San Francisco recommends anal screenings for people who engage in anal sex. The study found that people who have anal sex are more likely to develop anal cancer.

Be aware that not all doctors know how to do anal Paps...but some gastroenterologists and primary care doctors do. Again, to find the type of specialist you need, I suggest that you ask your regular doctor or public health department for a referral.

I hope that your symptom will soon resolve, and that you’ll keep monitoring your body for anything that seems unusual...no one knows your body like you do.

Related info:

Lisa Oldson, MD

Dr. Oldson is Medical Director of the Analyte Physicians Group. She is on staff at Northwestern Memorial Hospital, as well as Clinical Instructor at the Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University. Her areas of expertise include STDs (with a particular clinical emphasis on herpes), women's health, preventive medicine, diabetes, obesity and weight management, and mood and anxiety disorders. Dr. Oldson was educated at Rush Medical College and completed her residency at Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke's Medical Center in Chicago, IL.

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